treeA weekend storm in Dallas sported winds over 80 MPH and caused more than its fair share of damage in the surrounding areas. Now, tree removal companies are saying they have to prioritize the most important jobs and put others on hold because of the sheer number of requests they’ve received.

Jim Chase, with White Rock Tree Wizzards said that Wednesday was a hectic day. Approximately 20 million acres of lawn exist across the U.S., but even isolating damage to Dallas still accounts for a huge amount of land to service.

“A lot of frantic people [are] out there and we are try to get through the work as fast as we can,” he said.

Above all else, Chase has cautioned against homeowners trying to perform tree removal by themselves.

“We have had extensive training so if you don’t know what you are doing you could kill yourself real quick,” he said.

But trees weren’t the only victims of the weekend storm. Roofs and walls were damaged, and many homes suffered extensive power outages. At one point, nearly 250,000 people in the Dallas area were without power. Dallas Mayor Jim Pruitt said only one person suffered non-life-threatening injuries during the storm.

Kelly Secker and her husband, who live near White Rock Lake in East Dallas, were among the many residents in the area who suffered home and lawn damage. According to Secker, they both woke late at night to find their neighbors’ tree on top of their home.

“The bath and shower were destroyed and the rest of the tree came through the attic,” she said. “My husband and I were up there with buckets trying to catch the rain.”

The tree was so large that it had to be removed using a crane.

Roadways suffered damage, as well. The traffic marking paint — a $454 million industry as of 2014 — could barely be seen in areas where thick branches had fallen onto the road. Rising waterways and other debris made for a challenging commute after the storm, as well.

But the majority of Dallas residents are taking the damages and subsequent repairs in stride. John Diarse, a Dallas resident, explained that he didn’t really think the storm would do as much damage as it did.

“It’s kind of devastating. But, I mean, it happens. It happens. And I just kind of pick up and keep going,” he said.