motorcyclesThis Christmas, Santa’s gifts weren’t delivered with a sleigh or reindeer. Instead, many people received holiday warmth and cheer delivered on a Harley, as motorcycle clubs across the country made an effort to bring extra joy this holiday season.

Nearly 70% of men and 54% of women in America own more than 10 t-shirts, but for those who don’t, motorcycle clubs like The Forsaken Few in Oklahoma delivered clothes and other gifts. One of their members dressed up as Santa Claus, toy bag and all, to deliver gifts to underprivileged children before Christmas.

The Forsaken Few has been involved in such charity work for over 30 years, and this year they delivered toys to over 60 children across Southern Oklahoma. The members have all described it as a fulfilling experience, and say that the best part is seeing the smiles on children’s faces when they show up at the front door.

“We’re not like the TV motorcycle clubs. We like to ride our motorcycle[s] but we give to the community, we try to help out all we can,” said Schultz, a Forsaken Few member.

But Oklahoma isn’t the only state with a generous motorcycle club. Several largely Hispanic groups across Massachusetts performed an act of kindness this Christmas, collecting and donating warm clothing and winter supplies to homeless individuals near Springfield, MA.

Charity organizer Michael Villanueva explained that it was truly a successful inaugural event, and that he hopes it can continue in the years to come.

Many people seem to think that motorcycle clubs simply ride the open road, but these charities have proved that they’re much more than gangs of people who love motorcycles. Traffic marking paint used on roadways had a value of $454 billion in 2014, and while it keeps those motorcycle club participants safe, they’re focused on keeping children in their communities safe and happy.

Keeping children happy was exactly what Santa and the Lost Boys Motorcycle Club had in mind when they changed their name from the Wicked Riders. This year, their annual trip to visit the kids at the A. Harry Moore School was wildly successful.

The club visited the school’s physically and mentally disabled children, handing out gifts and even giving the kids a chance to sit on some of their motorcycles.

“[The kids] just get such a kick out of going on the motorcycles,” said Steve Goldberg, A. Harry Moore’s principal.

Members of the motorcycle club explained that the goal of these visits, and of the other charities the club participates in, is to give back to the community they live in. “What better way [to give back] than with the kids?” said Gabriel Baez, president of the Lost Boys New Jersey Chapter.